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Monday, October 23, 2017

Five Videos Of The South African "Gwara Gwara Dance" (information & videos)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post provides information about South Africa's contemporary social dance called "gwara gwara" (also written as gwaragwara") and showcases five YouTube videos of that dance.

The content of this post is provided for folkloric, cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to the DJ Bongz, the originator of this dance and thanks to all those who are featured in these videos. Thanks also to the composers and performers of the music which is featured in these videos. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publishers of these videos on YouTube.

****
INFORMATION ABOUT THE "GWARA GWARA DANCE"
What is "Gwara Gwara"?
"Gwara Gwara" is a social dance that began trending in South Africa in 2016 thanks to its performance and promotion by South African dancer DJ Bongz. The earliest YouTube video of this dance that I've found was published by DURBANDANCE on January 22, 2016 and is entitled "Tarabha DJ Bongz #MrGwara Gwara Dance" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tOxo89zY2so
(805,853 views as of October 22, 2017 4:27 PM EDT). That video is given below as Example #1.

Another early video of this dance "Dj bongz Gwaragwara dance compilation" (109,986 views) was published on Feb 27, 2016 by TK Tube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5obClFsN0I The brief summary of that video indicates that this is "dj bongz well known famous dance". That summary may mean that Dj Bongz is a well known famous dancer [in South Africa].

Comparisons Between "Gwara Gwara" And Two Other African Social Dances
All of the "Gwara Gwara" YouTube videos that I've found were published in 2016 and most of the commenters on those videos' discussion threads wrote comments in 2016. Many of those commenters describe "Gwara Gwara" as a very popular social dance in South Africa. In the discussion thread for the video given below as Example #4 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mt4C1kdTiyM DANCE GWARA GWARA COMPILATION), several Angolan commenters wrote that the "Gwara Gwara" dance was actually the Angolan dance named "Kuduro". Other commenters in the discussion thread for the "SA DANCE GWARA GWARA COMPILATION" video mentioned above wrote that "Gwara Gwara" was like [Ghana's] Azonto dance. However, other commenters refuted that comparison indicating that the two dances are nothing alike.
Pancocojams posts on "Kuduro" and on "Azonto" can be found by using this blog's internal search engine.

The Music Used To Dance "Gwara Gwara"
"Gwara Gwara" appears to be danced [or was danced] to Southern African "House" instrumental music. For example, a commenter in the discussion thread for the Jul 23, 2016 video entitled "Gwara gwara n bhenga dance" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tj9pBAXJXzM indicated that the music track being danced to was "Xoli M - 1000 Hearts". And a munber of commenters indicated that the track that was used in the video given below as Example #4 was the Angolan "House" music track "Wololo" by Dj Maceeya.

What Does The Name "Gwara Gwara" Mean?
In 2016 Vodacom Mkhize, a commmenter in that video's discussion thread gave this reply to the question "What does "Gwara Gwara" mean:
"It's a bird, it's a variation of gwala gwala/ligwalagwala/igwalagwala, a Zulu/Ndebele bird (maybe an African parrot) which was used by kings like Shaka to honour a brave person. The dance is from the moves of the bird, but it's better to ask the inventors anyway."

The Gwara Gwara Dance Outside Of South Africa
I'm not sure if "Gwara Gwara" is still popular in South Africa in 2017. However, that dance have spread to some other African nations. A pancocojams post on what purports to be the "Gwara Gwara" dance performed by Nigerians will be published ASAP and the link to that post will be added here. It should be noted that numerous South African commenters in that video's discussion thread vehemently refuted the claim that the dance performed in that video is in fact "Gwara Gwara".

****
SHOWCASE VIDEOS
Example #1: TARABHA DJ BONGZ #MRGWARA GWARA DANCE



DURBANDANCE, Published on Jan 22, 2016

DJ BONGZ GWARA GWARA CHALLENGE

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Example #2: KIDS DANCE the GWARA GWARA South African DANCE



Courtney Danelli, Published on Mar 18, 2017

The gwara gwara South African dance

GWARA GWARA dance KIDS

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Example #3: BEST SA DANCE gwara gwara



Tebogo Ndou, Published on Mar 15, 2017

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Example #4: SA DANCE GWARA GWARA COMPILATION



TMan Ostrong, Published on Apr 17, 2016

Dj Bongz's Gwara Gwara, The Trending Dance

Watch The Second Episode Here: https://youtu.be/9wFByqn8nZc

****
Example #5: Gwaragwara dance tutorial (Basics )



ipfi mbedzi, Published on Sep 2, 2016

If you have always wanted to do the gwaragwara you can start here

****
Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Sunday, October 22, 2017

Some Distinctive African American Female Names That Begin With "La"

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post provides some examples of distinctive African American female names that begin with "La".

The content of this post is presented for onomastics and cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those are quoted in this post.
-snip-
This post serves as a companion to this pancocojams post about examples of distinctive African American males names that begin with "La": http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/10/some-distinctive-african-american-male.html

****
PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTE
According to my reading, African Americans are known to have a larger name pool than most population groups within the United States. Distinctive African American names include names that aren't commonly given in the United States. These names may be from traditional African languages, or from Arabic, or from other languages throughout the world, including certain names from European languages and from Hebrew which aren't that familiar in the United States. Distinctive African American names are also names that are newly created using a number of different strategies. Among those strategies are respelling an already existing name so that it more closely fits how it is pronounced, adding a prefix or a suffix to an already existing name, or adding a prefix or suffix to a variant of an existing name, or to a relatively newly coined name.

My interest in what I refer to as "distinctive" African American given names (meaning "first and middle names") was sparked when I received my "African free name"* "Azizi" in 1968. "African free names" is a term that afrocentric African Americans used in the late 1960s and 1970s to refer to traditional African or Arabic given names (or less often, to African or Arabic first names and last names) that were either chosen by individuals or given to individuals by other people. "Free names" replaced the European/Hebrew birth names which were called "slave names".

"Azizi" is a Swahili form of the Arabic female name "Aziza". In part because of Swahili's close relationship with Arabic, that East African and Central African language was the first traditional African languages that African Americans used as a source for our names and our children's names. Thanks to the availability of published books on African names in the 1970s, more African Americans began choosing given names from Akan, from Yoruba, Zulu, and from certain other traditional African languages.

In my admittedly informal study of African American names, I've noticed that there appears to be certain sound preferences among many African Americans that aren't necessarily shared by other people in the United States. Among those sound preferences are given names that begin with the prefix "La" (pronounced "lah"). There are many more female African American names with the prefix "La", but, as this post shows, there are also a number of male names that begin with that prefix. It seems to me that "being unique" was (and still is to perhaps a somewhat lesser extent) when many African Americans (and some other Americans had) were (are) deciding on given names for their newborns. And I've also noticed that for some African Americans at least by the 1970s, the way that a name was written was almost as important as how the name was pronounced. A name could be spelled "the regular way" or spelled differently to more closely conform to the way it sounds. The first letter in the second syllable could be capitalized and/or an apostrophe or hyphen could separate the first syllable from the second syllable. Less often, the name could include an accent mark. And, as the first excerpt given below, the African American custom of conferring distinctive given names began centuries before the late 1960s and 1970s, although that custom appears to have increased during those decades.

Read my speculation below in the comment section about why I think the "la" prefix for females and males is one of the foremost sound preferences among African Americans.
-snip-
*Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2011/09/how-i-got-my-african-name.html for the 2011 pancocojams post entitled "How I Got My African Name".

** Of course, all names were "made up" at one time or another.

****
LISTS OF DISTINCTIVE AFRICAN AMERICAN GIVEN FEMALE NAMES THAT BEGIN WITH "LA"
Pancocojams Editor:
Except for this first excerpt, these lists are given in no particular order. These lists are numbered for referencing purposes only.

Note: These "distinctive African American female names" can also be given to females of other races or ethnicities -with "ethnicity" in the United States referring to Latinos (Latinas)/Hispanics. Latinos (Latinas)/Hispanics can be of any race.

EXCERPT #1 [selected examples from that book]
From Proud Heritage: 11,001 Names For Your African-American Baby editor Elza Dinwiddie-Boyd (Avon Books, 1994)

page 310
La - Puckett* documents an early preference for the La phoneme in these names: La Blanche, La Dora, La Eunice, La Fay, La Jeune, La Perle, La Rossie, La Rue Forrest, La Tausca, La Vada, La Verne, La Zora.

Laetitia - A spelling variation of Letitia (see below) found among free black names**, 1800-64

Lahalia -This rhythmical use of La was noted in 1877-1937

page 311
Laney -This unusual given name is found among free black women during the 19th century

Lanieash- Lanieash Lloyd is a West Indian American who lives in Queens, N. Y.

Latia - Latia Curry of New York's Peter Stuyvesant High School is a track and field champion

Latiffah - An African American spelling variation of the Arabic Latifah, which connotes gentle kindness. Rap artist Queen Latifah has given this name new currency.

La Toya - Perhaps the controversial La Toya Jackson of th famed Jackson family can be credited with the proliferation of this name. The Diary of LaToya Hunter: My First Year in Junior High bu LaToya Hunter won this 12-year old a review in the pages of the New York Times.

Latrice*** - Latrice George was a 2003 recipient of a Project Excellence scholarship. Founded by Carl T. Rowan, the fund, during its sixth annual dinner honoring academic excellence, awarded 80 gifted black Washingon, D. C. area high school seniors scholarships totaling $1.3 million.

From the chapter "African Names For Girls" [These are all of the "La" names on this list.]

****
page 398
Laini - Swahili: Sweet and gentle, soft, Laini "Muki" Brown is an aspiring record company executive.

Lama - Arabic: Darkness of lips

Lamis - Arabic; softness to the touch

Lateefah - Arabic: pleasant, gentle woman.

Lateefah - Arabic: Gentle, kind. Queen Latifah is a not always gentle rap artist.

Layla - Swahili: She was born at night.

The chapter "Newly Created Names For Girls" (pages 431-435) of this book lists more than 400 names that begin with the letters "la". Here are 25 names from that list which aren't found on the other lists that are given below are

Lachante
La Chelle
Lachelle
Lacheryl
Ladawn
La Kenya
La Kita
Lakita
La Quan
Laquana
LaRae
Lakresa
La Shanda
La Shante
La Sheena
La' Shona
Latrina
Latavis
Latarsha
Latricia
Lasheba
Lashelle
Lashirelle
Lastarr
Lawanza
-snip-
*Black Names in America: Origins and Usage – 1975
by Newbell Niles Puckett (Author), Murray Heller (Editor)

**In the context of this list, "free black names" means names given to or selected Black Americans who weren't enslaved

*** Regarding the female name "Latrice":
From http://rupaulsdragrace.wikia.com/wiki/Latrice_Royale
Latrice Royale is the stage name of drag performer Timothy Wilcots, best known for competing in the fourth season of RuPaul's Drag Race, and RuPaul's All Stars Drag Race.....

Date of Birth: February 12, 1972"
-snip-
Also, click https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RuPaul%27s_Drag_Race for information about and dates for this television series.

****Regarding the Arabic female names given in that list, the only Arabic female names beginning with "La" that I've come across (either directly or indirectly) are the names "Latifah" (also with variant spellings) and the name "Layla" (with variant spellings, particularly "Laila"). Both of these Arabic female names, but particularly "Layla" are quite frequently given to African American girls, regardless of their parents' religion.

****
EXCERPT #2 [selected examples from that website page]
From https://www.behindthename.com/names/letter/l

LADONNA f African American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name DONNA.

LAETITIA f Late Roman, French
Original form of LETITIA, as well as the French form.

LAKEISHA f African American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name KEISHA.*

LAKESHIA f African American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name KESHIA.

LAKISHA f African American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name KISHA.

LAILA (1) f Arabic, English
Variant of LAYLA.

LASHAWN f & m African American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name SHAWN.

LASHAY m African American (Rare)
Combination of the popular name prefix La and SHAY (1).

LASHONDA f African American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name SHONDA.

LATANYA f African American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name TANYA.

LATASHA f African American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name TASHA.

LATEEFAH f Arabic
Variant transcription of LATIFA.

LATIFA f Arabic
Feminine form of LATIF.

LATIFAH f Arabic
Feminine form of LATIF.

LATISHA f African American
Variant of LETITIA.

LATONYA f African American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name TONYA.

LATOYA f African American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name TOYA.

LAVONE f English (Rare)
Variant of LAVONNE.

LAVONNE f English
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name YVONNE.

LAWANDA f African American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name WANDA.

LAYLA f Arabic, English
Means "night" in Arabic. This was the name of the object of romantic poems written by the 7th-century poet known as Qays. The story of Qays and Layla became a popular romance in medieval Arabia and Persia. The name became used in the English-speaking world after the 1970 release of the song 'Layla' by Derek and the Dominos, the title of which was inspired by the medieval story.
-snip-

*Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/06/the-real-sources-of-female-name-keisha.html The REAL Sources Of The Female Name "Keisha" and http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/06/the-racialization-of-female-name-keisha.html The Racialization Of The Female Name "Keisha" & Its Variants for two pancocojams posts about the female name "Kiesha".

Here's information about the Arabic male name "Latif" from www.behindthename.com/names/letter/l:
"LATIF m Arabic
Means "gentle, kind" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition اللطيف (al-Latif) is one of the 99 names of Allah."

****
EXCERPT #3 [complete listing of "la" names for African American females from that site]
From http://www.babynames.org.uk/african-american-names-list-l.htm
Lacrasha--------- La-Shonna
Lacrecia--------- La-sondra
Lacresia--------- Lataesha
Lacricia--------- Latanna
Lacrishia ------- Latasia
Ladaishia-------- Lataya
La-Dale ----------Lateasia
Ladawn------------La-Teesha
Ladawnah----------Lateia
Ladona -----------Lateica
Ladonne ----------Laticia
La-fara-----------La-Ticia
LaJonel ----------Latitia
La-juana----------Latoiya
Lajuanna----------Latona
Lakasha ----------Latondra
Lakeitha ---------Latonia
LaKendria---------Latonna
Laketta ----------Latonya
La-Keysha --------Latore
Lakitia-----------Latoria
Lakresha ---------Latorray
Lakyta------------Latoya
Lamesha ----------Latreece
Lameshia----------Latreese
Lanecia ----------La-trice
La-Neesa----------Latrina
La-Neisha --------Latrisha
La-Neishah -------Lavern
Laqueinta --------Laverne
Laquenetta -------La-Verne
Laquetta ---------La-Von
Laquinda ---------Lavonn
Laquitta----------LaVonne
La'Rae -----------La'Wanda
Larah ------------La-wanda
Larhonda
La-rhonda
Lashane
Lashanna
Lashaune
Lashaunta
La'Shawn
Lashawna
Lashona
-snip-
Note that some of these female names that are variants of the name "Sean" ("Shawn", "Shon", "Shaun") and that don't end in "a" are actually unisex names as they are also used as male names. Also, names that end in the suffix "von" which don't end in "a" are also unisex names.

That said, the only African American female and male names on that website's names beginning with "l" page are the names "Lavon" and "Lavonne".

Also note that this list of African American names beginning with "La" is an incomplete sample. I know African American females with other names which aren't on that list, including an African American woman in her 50s or 60s who was given the birth name "Lavonda" and an African American female in her late 60s whose name is "La Rue." I also know an African American female in her late 60s who spells her name "Laquita" and not the similar spellings given above. I also know a

****
EXCERPT #4 [complete listing of "la" names for "Black Baby Girl Names" from that site]
From http://www.top-100-baby-names-search.com/black-baby-girl-names.html [These numbers are given on that website]
324 Lacara
325 Ladell
326 Lafyette
327 Lakedra
328 Lakesia
329 Lalique
330 Landon
331 Laquita
332 Larieka
333 Larriel
334 Lashaya
335 Latavia
336 Latresia

*****
Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Friday, October 20, 2017

Some Distinctive African American Male Names That Begin With "La"

Edited by Azizi Powell

[Revised October 11, 2017]

This pancocojams post provides some examples of distinctive African American male names that begin with "La".

The content of this post is presented for onomastics and cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those are quoted in this post.
-snip-
The idea for this post came to me after reading about four members of the United States military-Sgt. La David Johnson (African American), Staff Sergeant Bryan Black, Staff Sgt. Jeremiah Johnson, and Staff Sgt. Dustin Wright (White Americans)- who were killed in an ambush on October 4, 2017 in Niger, West Africa.
Click https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2017_Tongo_Tongo_ambush for information about that ambush. RIP to all who lost their lives in that tragedy.
-snip-
Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/10/some-distinctive-african-american.html for the companion pancocojams post "Some Distinctive African American Male Names That Begin With "La"

****
PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTE
According to my reading, African Americans are known to have a larger name pool than most population groups within the United States. Distinctive African American names include names that aren't commonly given in the United States. These names may be from traditional African languages, or from Arabic, or from other languages throughout the world, including certain names from European languages and from Hebrew which aren't that familiar in the United States. Distinctive African American names are also names that are newly created using a number of different strategies. Among those strategies are respelling an already existing name so that it more closely fits how it is pronounced, adding a prefix or a suffix to an already existing name, or adding a prefix or suffix to a variant of an existing name, or to a relatively newly coined name.

My interest in what I refer to as "distinctive" African American given names (meaning "first and middle names") was sparked when I received my "African free name"* "Azizi" in 1968. "African free names" is a term that afrocentric African Americans used in the late 1960s and 1970s to refer to traditional African or Arabic given names (or less often, to African or Arabic first names and last names) that were either chosen by individuals or given to individuals by other people. "Free names" replaced the European/Hebrew birth names which were called "slave names".

"Azizi" is a Swahili form of the Arabic female name "Aziza". In part because of Swahili's close relationship with Arabic, that East African and Central African language was the first traditional African languages that African Americans used as a source for our names and our children's names. Thanks to the availability of published books on African names in the 1970s, more African Americans began choosing given names from Akan, from Yoruba, Zulu, and from certain other traditional African languages.

In my admittedly informal study of African American names, I've noticed that there appears to be certain sound preferences among many African Americans that aren't necessarily shared by other people in the United States. Among those sound preferences are given names that begin with the prefix "La" (pronounced "lah"). There are many more female African American names with the prefix "La", but, as this post shows, there are also a number of male names that begin with that prefix. It seems to me that "being unique" was (and still is to perhaps a somewhat lesser extent) when many African Americans (and some other Americans had) were (are) deciding on given names for their newborns. And I've also noticed that for some African Americans at least by the 1970s, the way that a name was written was almost as important as how the name was pronounced. A name could be spelled "the regular way" or spelled differently to more closely conform to the way it sounds. The first letter in the second syllable could be capitalized and/or an apostrophe or hyphen could separate the first syllable from the second syllable. Less often, the name could include an accent mark. And, as the first excerpt given below, the African American custom of conferring distinctive given names began centuries before the late 1960s and 1970s, although that custom appears to have increased during those decades.

Read my speculation below in the comment section about why I think the "la" prefix for females and males is one of the foremost sound preferences among African Americans.
-snip-
*Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2011/09/how-i-got-my-african-name.html for the 2011 pancocojams post entitled "How I Got My African Name".

** Of course, all names were "made up" at one time or another.

Note: These "distinctive African American male names" can also be given to males of other races or ethnicities (with "ethnicity" in the United States referring to Latinos (Latinas)/Hispanics. Latinos (Latinas)/Hispanics can be of any race.

****
LISTS OF DISTINCTIVE AFRICAN AMERICAN GIVEN MALE NAMES THAT BEGIN WITH "LA"
Pancocojams Editor:
Except for this first excerpt, these lists are given in no particular order. These lists are numbered for referencing purposes only.

EXCERPT #1 [selected examples]
From Proud Heritage: 11,001 Names For Your African-American Baby editor Elza Dinwiddie-Boyd (Avon Books, 1994)
page 92
"La Quarius - newly created. This name is known among elementary school students in Detroit.

Labert - This name is another demonstration of the African American fondness for blending LA with a wide variety of endings that often make the new name a unique creation.

LaBron - also LeBron. Although used for several generations by black parents, these names smack of that African-American penchant for creating new sounds in naming their children. LeBron Simmons, a noteworthy atorney in Detroit during the 1950s and 1960s, was a staunch advocate for the poor and the underpriviledged.

[...]

Lafayette - Marquis de Lafayette, a French nobleman, joined Gen. Washington's army in 1777. His fame spread throughout the country, and his surname was often taken as a first name by free black and white parents. Rare in the 20th century.


Lamar French: Of the sea. Also Lemar. First used by black parents in the late 19th century. Lamar remains in

[page 93]

frequent use today. Lamar McGriggs played for the New York Giants football team.

[...]

Larnell - Apparently a recent African-American creation, only a few generations old. Also Larney.

[...]

[page 94

LaSalle French: the hall. NBA stalwart LaSalle Rhompson is an Indiana Pacer.

[...]

Laval - An African American original. Laval Perry is the CEO of All American Ford, Inc., the nation's 71st largest black-owned automobile dealership.

Lavar- An African-American original. Also Levar, Le Var, La Var. Popularized in the late 1970s when actor Le Var Burton played Kunte Kinte in the TV miniseries of Alex Haley's Roots.

Lavon - An African American original

Lawanza - Newly created. Lawanza Spears was a cum laude graduate of the class of 1993, Howard University."

[...]
From the chapter "Newly Created names for boys"
[page 217]
Laaris-------------Lajuan-------------Lapreece
Labar--------------Lakendric----------Laprell
Labarius-----------Lakendrick---------La Prese
LaBradford---------Lakim--------------Laquan
Labrando-----------Lakista------------Laquavis
Labrawn------------Lamarcus-----------Laquenton
Lacatron-----------La Mare------------Laquon
Ladall-------------Lamario------------La Ray
Ladaniel-----------Lamaris------------Larmar
Ladarian-----------Lamark ------------Larmel
LaDarrell----------Lamarque-----------Larmell
La Derek-----------Lamarr-------------La Rocque
Ladexter-----------Lameek-------------Larod
Ladrius------------Landell------------La Ron
Lafonzo------------LaNeil-------------Larome
La Jack------------Lanorris-----------Laron
Lajavon------------Lanue--------------Larrick
La Juan------------Laphonso-----------Lashajuan

[page 218]
Lashaud
La Shawn
Lashon
Lashwan
Lathaniel
Latrell
Lavall
Lavalle
La Vance
La Vaughn
Lavar
La Vaughn
Lavaughan
La Vell
La Vonte
Lavoris
La Waan
Lawanza
LaZelle
Laserick"

****
From the chapter "African Names For Boys"

[...]
Lasana Central Africa:A poet of the people

[...]

Lateef = Arabic: Gentle, pleasant one

****
EXCERPT #2
From https://www.behindthename.com/names/gender/masculine/usage/african-american
"LAMAR m English, African American
From a French and English surname, originally from a place name in Normandy, which was derived from Old French la mare meaning "the pool".
LASHAWN f & m African American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name SHAWN.
LASHAY m African American (Rare)
Combination of the popular name prefix La and SHAY (1)."
-snip-
The only other "L" name on this list is "LEBRON m African American (Rare)
Meaning unknown, probably an invented name. This is the name of basketball player LeBron James (1984-)."

****
EXCERPT #3
http://www.babynames.org.uk/african-american-names-list-l.htm
African American Baby Names Dictionary
"La-corey
La-Ron
Ladrus
Lamar
Lamark
Lamarr
Lamont
Lance
Laran
Larent
Larice
Larmar
Laron
Lasean
Lasil
Lason
Lathan
Latrell
Latrivis
Lavan
Lavaughan
Lavernus
Lavon
Lavonne"
-snip-
This list includes seventeen additional names. Nine of those names begin with the letters "Le".

****
EXCERPT #4
From http://www.top-100-baby-names-search.com/black-baby-names-for-boys.html
[Pancocojams Editor: This website purports to list the top Black baby boy names. The numbers listed are the numbers that this site's editors have given for these names.]
"299 La Dorian
300 Labron"

http://www.top-100-baby-names-search.com/black-boys-names.html
"301 Ladarrell
302 Laelim
303 Lamarcus
304 Laquez
305 Latrelle"

****
EXCERPT #5
[Note: Excerpts from thinkbabynames.com don't distinguish between which race or races or ethnic group (meaning Latino/Hispanic) uses or used these names]
From http://www.thinkbabynames.com/start/1/La
“La- baby names and what they mean with 77 results. La- names are used more often as feminine names. Usage of these boy names was at its apex in the 1940s ... and is now much less... with names like Laurence going out of style. The most fashionable birth names in this list are Lawson (#438), Langston (#691), Lachlan (#768), Lane (#296) and Layton (#544), while Lauer (TOP 2%) and Laws (2%) are conventional La- last names...

La-, var. Lavonte, Lavon, Lavell, Lavaughn, Lavante, Lavar, Laval, Latrell, Lashawn, Laroyce, Lasean, Laroy, Laron, Larenzo, Laray, Larell, Lamont, Lamario, Lamarcus, Lajon, Lamar, Ladell, Ladale
Root fr. American. .. Pronunciation emphasis is on the second .. Adoption of Laval and forms was more pronounced 45 years ago and has become diminished.

[...]

Lafayette
Derived fr. French. .. Historical. A moderately offbeat boys' name, Lafayette is found more frequently as a surname.

[...]

Lamar2, var. Lamarre, Lamarr
Based on Old French, Old German elements. "The water; land famous." Lamar was among 2015's Top names.

[....]

Lambert and variants
Lambert, var. Landbert, Lambirt, Lamberto, Lambart
Stems fr. Scandinavian. "Land brilliant." Usage of Landbert and forms was expansive during 1910-1919.

Lamont and variants
Lamont2, var. Lamonte, Lamond, Lammond
Root fr. Old Norse. "Law man." Lammond and Lamond are more rarefied as boys' names among the forms of Lamont.

Lamont and variants
Lamont2, var. Lamonte, Lamond, Lammond

Root fr. Old Norse. "Law man." Lammond and Lamond are more rarefied as boys' names among the forms of Lamont.

[...]

Lamar2, var. Lamarre, Lamarr
Based on Old French, Old German elements. "The water; land famous." Lamar was among 2015's Top names.

Lambert and variants
Lambert, var. Landbert, Lambirt, Lamberto, Lambart
Stems fr. Scandinavian. "Land brilliant." Usage of Landbert and forms was expansive during 1910-1919."

****
From http://www.thinkbabynames.com/meaning/1/Larron
What does Larron mean?

"Larron

Pronunciation of Larron [lar-ron] as a boys' name. Modern name: possibly blend of Darron with L-, or a variant of Lawrence.

VARIANTS Laren, Larin, Laron, Larran, Larren, Larrin

RELATIONS VIA DARRON, LAWRENCE Daran, Daren, Darin, Daron, Darran, Darrin, Darryn, Daryn, Derren, Derrin, Derron, Laranz, Larenz, Larrance, Larrence, Larrens, Larrey, Larry, Lars, Lauren, Laurens, Laurent, Laurenz, Laurie, Lavrans, Lavrens, Lawrey, Lawrie, Lawry, Lon, Loren, Lorin, Lorrenz, Lorry"

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Thursday, October 19, 2017

Trinidadian Folk Song & Children's Game Song "Afouyèkè" (information, video, & lyrics)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcases the the Trinidadian song "Afouyèkè". According to a book on Eastern Caribbean game songs entitled Brown Girl In The Ring, "Afouyèkè" is performed as a dance song by adults. A YouTube video which is embedded in this post shows children performing a game while singing this song.

The content of this post is presented for folkloric, cultural, and recreational purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are featured in this video and thanks to Alan Lomax, J. D. Elder, and Bess Lomax Hawes for editing the 1997 Brown Girl In The Ring: An Anthology Of Song Games From The Eastern Caribbean. That book included lyrics for and information about the Trinidad & Tobago Children's Game "Afouyèkè". Thanks also to the publisher of this videos on YouTube.

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SHOWCASE VIDEO -Trinidad Patois Ring Game- Afouyèkè- Caribbean yard Campus Patois Class, Talparo



katvixenchick, Published on Oct 23, 2016
-snip-
This game was performed by adult women and school aged girls and boys.

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LYRICS "AFOUYEKE" (version #1)
[English version from the video that is embedded in this post:

Oh, sweet Mama
Sweeter than sugar
Sweeter than syrup
Oh, sweet Mama
Stones to cut down trees
Open the ring
Open it in time
Close the ring
Close it in time
Dance in the ring
Dance in time
Yekay for us to see

[repeat the words to this song any number of times]
-snip-
ring = the circle
Yekay - This word is used as a verb for any type of dance move that the person in the middle chooses to do.
-snip-
Pancocojams Editor's Note:
From It doesn't appear that the gender of the line "Oh sweet Mama" changes when a male goes into the center of the ring (circle). However, groups who perform this song may chose to sing "Oh, sweet Papa" when a male is the center person.
The lyrics to Version #2 is slightly different from version #1 and the spelling for some of the same patois words in both versions are slightly different.

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LYRICS: "AFOUYEKE" (Version #2)
From
"Sung by the Rose Of Sharon Friendly Society Chorus in Blanchisseuse, St. George, Trinidad

CREOLE

Solo - Afouyèkè
Dou man-dou manman
Group - Afouyèkè
Solo - ròuch gwo lariviè gonmbo

(Alternation continues)

Afouyèkè
Hach ka hachè bwa -
Afouyèkè
Machè laronn-la- come into the game
Afouyèkè
Ouvè -laronne-la
Afouyèkè
Dansè -laronne-la
Afouyèkè
Yèkè pou mwen ouè-ou
Afouyèkè
O dou manman
Afouyèkè
Dou – dou manman
Afouyèkè

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SINGABLE TRANSLATION
Solo - Afouyèkè
Group- Oh, my sweet mama
slippery river stones
Solo -axes cutting wood

(Alternation continues)

come into the game
Open up the game
Dance into the game
Twist so I can see
Oh, see mama
Sweet. Sweet mama

TO PLAY
This is not a true game, just a circle with partners dancing in the middle; as they tire, they rejoin the circle and others take their place. The dancers improvise their movements in response to the soloist's lead lines, each one different, each one joyous, inside the supportive circle underneath the Caribbean night sky."

-snip-
Pancocojams Editor's Note: The source for both of these lyric forms (for Version #2) is Brown Girl In The Ring: An Anthology Of Song Games From The Eastern Caribbean, editors: Alan Lomax, J. D. Elder, and Bess Lomax Hawes < (New York, Pantheon Books, 2997, page 59)

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INFORMATION ABOUT THE SINGING GAME "AFOUYEKE"
From Alan Lomax, J. D. Elder, and Bess Lomax Hawes for editing the 1997 Brown Girl In The Ring: An Anthology Of Song Games From The Eastern Caribbean (New York, Pantheon Books, 2997, page 58, 59)
"ABOUT THE SONG
The Rose Of Sharon singers of Trinidad are bilingual though most of their songs are in English, this adult dance song is in the Creole language. The singable English translation given here is not as poetic as the Creole text but approximates its literal meaning. This song demonstrates well the characteristic two-phrase litany of West Africa: the second phrase, "Afouyèkè" (probably an African word), being repeated over and over by the group, he lead singer's brief, improvised poetic phrases being thrown in in no particular order. This is a very frequent dance accompaniment style in the Lesser Antilles."
-snip-
Pancocojams Editor's note:
Out of curiosity, I searched for results in Google translate for the word "Afouyèkè". Here are three results:
Yoruba (Nigeria, West Africa) = Opportunity

Igbo (Nigeria, West Africa) = Opportunity

Haitian Creole - Awakening

These definitions fit how "Afouyèkè" is used in these songs. I think that it's very possible that the word "Afouyèkè" (and yèkè) in this Trinidadian song comes from either Yoruba or Igbo or both languages. And it's also very possible that the meaning of that word was changed to "awakening" in Haitian Creole. If the word "Afouyèkè did originally come from Yoruba and/or Igbo, note how the meaning of yèkè" (yekay) was further changed to mean some type of dance move.

I wonder if there's any connection between the word "afouyèkè" in this song and the word "yèkè" in the title of the 1990s hit Guinean song "Yeke Yeke".

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/10/mory-kante-yeke-yeke-i1990s-hit-guinean.html for a pancocojams post about the Yeke Yeke" from Guinea, West Africa.

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